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How to Prevent Getting Fired in 5 Steps

You’ve heard the rumors: your company will be laying off employees. And maybe you think there’s nothing you can do about it.

 

But you’re wrong. Someone will make a decision about which workers to keep and which to let go. That decision will be based on how valuable or essential each person is to the company’s future success. Factors considered could range from your productivity ratings to your enthusiasm in supporting the team’s morale.

 

Here are five steps you can take to get yourself on the “keep” list.

 

Outwork Your Peers.

You want your employer to see you as the hardest worker on the team. Clock in before everyone else and leave after they do. Volunteer to help out a colleague who’s overwhelmed, and never say “it’s not my job” when asked to take on extra assignments.

 

Check Your Last Performance Review.

You want your supervisor to have nothing bad to say about you. Were any weaknesses were pointed out to you during your last review? Focus on improving those areas.

 

Promote Yourself.

You want everyone to know how great a job you’re doing. Without being pushy, bring your accomplishments into conversations with your superiors. Rehearse a two-minute “elevator speech” so you’ll be ready when the chance arises.

 

Cross-Train Yourself.

You want to offer as many skills to the company as possible. Seize opportunities to become familiar with the work of other departments. Then, when staff cuts come to your department, you can suggest a transfer rather than a termination.

 

Be Everyone’s Friend.

You want to be that great team player your boss would hate to let go. Face it, these decisions are not always made based solely on merit. Sometimes it’s the one who’s liked the least who gets the axe.

 

Follow these steps and you’ll be the MVP that doesn’t get released. In fact, they may even help you up the next step of your career ladder!

 
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