Integrity Staffing Solutions
best of staffing 2019 client 2x 1

Host Fewer, Shorter and Way More Effective Meetings

Probably the biggest productivity saboteur in the workplace today: the meeting. The meeting that was supposed to take an hour and ended up consuming the entire morning. The meeting where everyone talked in circles and nothing got decided or resolved. The meeting where information was pushed at people who barely even pretended to pay attention.

 

Wouldn’t it be great if those meetings could happen less often, in less time, and still achieve the same — or even better — results? We’re here to tell you it can be done! Here are the strategies we at Integrity Staffing Solutions use to make this dream a reality.

 

Eliminate the Non-Essential.

Ask yourself if this meeting is really necessary. Do you really need production updates more than once a week, or is the same information being repeated from one meeting to the next? How about once a week, or even one every two weeks?

 

Ask yourself how many people really need to attend. Remember, the more man-hours are tied up in your meeting, the fewer are spent on production. Maybe some colleagues would do just as well if they just saw the post-meeting report.

 

Issue a Pre-Meeting Brief.

Any background information relevant to the subject of the meeting should be distributed at least one day beforehand, so that no time is wasted reviewing it during the meeting itself.

 

Give Everyone a Written Agenda.

Assign a specific time for each discussion point. This almost always works because people automatically adjust themselves to the allotted time frame. When speakers are in danger of running overtime, give them a two-minute warning.

 

Establish Concrete, Actionable Goals.

The purpose of any meeting should be to determine the next steps toward a goal. Vague “we need to update our marketing plan” statements are a prescription for long, inconclusive discussions. Better: “allocate marketing resources for the new product line.”

 

Assign Follow-Up Actions.

Everyone should leave the meeting knowing exactly what the next steps are, who is responsible for executing them and by what date. All this should be spelled out in the post-meeting report that is distributed to all attendees and any other personnel who will be involved in accomplishing the follow-up goals.

 

Using these formulas for pre-, in- and post-meeting procedures should significantly cut the amount of time you spend talking about business instead of doing business.

 

Bonus Tips

 

No meeting will last longer than one hour.

No phones, tablets or laptops allowed (unless necessary to conduct the meeting).

No formal presentations. These should be in the pre-meeting information distribution, and everyone should come prepared to discuss them.

No waiting or backtracking for latecomers. If the tardy individual absolutely must be present, reschedule the meeting.

 

You might be interested in...

4.08.19
Why I Wear a Pink Suit
  As a millennial in the workplace, I always dreaded networking events. I would find myself miserable in a black or navy suit and after a few less than successful events, I knew I needed to make a change. One afternoon I headed to Macy’s on a mission and found an all pink sports coat that changed my life. Here’s how:   I stand out At a networking event, there will be tons of people. Upon entering it may be tough to differentiate between who you’ve talked to and who you’ve haven’t. When you network, you want to be memorable. Trying to stand out to potential clients and employers is tough enough but especially when you’re in a sea of black and navy blue attire. However, nothing says “Remember me!” like a bubble gum pink sports jacket.    It Makes Me Confident I’ll be honest, when I wear my pink jacket, I think I look great! And because of that, my confidence skyrockets. Where I’m usually shy or more reserved, I’m able to come out of my shell and speak up. I’m not afraid to...
Read More
7.26.18
How Do You Define a Great Leader?
    Countless books and articles have been written on this subject, and everyone has an idea of what qualities they expect to see in a leader. Here's our take.   Vision Great leaders have a very clear idea of what they want and how they're going to accomplish it. And they can clearly explain those goals to anyone and everyone.   Confidence You can recognize great leaders by their air of calm assurance that they'll always be successful in the end, even when things don't go according to plan. This is not the same thing as arrogance, cockiness or boastfulness.   Consistency Great leaders don't waffle back and forth when making decisions, or change their orders from one day to the next. They make up their minds, then make a total commitment to seeing it through.   Responsibility As the sign on President Truman's desk said, "The buck stops here." Great leaders take responsibility for everything under their command, and don't blame others when things aren't going...
Read More
7.05.18
How to Tell Your Boss No Without Hurting Your Career
"I don't have time to do that." "I think that's a stupid idea." "It's not my job."   When your boss asks you to do something, these answers may be perfectly true, but they're also guaranteed to make him/her angry.   As the saying goes, you catch more flies with honey than with vinegar. Let's see how a more diplomatic wording can get you out of an assignment while staying in your supervisor's good graces.   You really don't have time. The problem with just saying that is the questions it puts in your boss's head: doesn't this employee know how to prioritize tasks or handle a normal workload?   Instead: Ask for help prioritizing your projects. Make sure your boss fully realizes everything you're working on, how long it will take to finish, and what would have to be postponed in order to accomplish the new task.   You don't think it will work. Maybe you've seen this same or similar idea already tried and failed, or it just doesn't seem well thought out....
Read More
General

Title

More Info
You need an account to do that Set up an account Never Mind

Please register for an account first. If you already have one, log in here.