10 New Ways to Intro Your Email

  • email intros fb

 

Dear Fill-in-the-Name, 

This is to inform you that the above is the commonest email (and letter) opening in history. It's the safe choice ... but don't expect your reader to stay awake. 

 

If it's just a courtesy note, you don't need it to instigate immediate attention or action. But in a business setting, you quite often do. Try one of these 10 options for making a more memorable connection: 

 

1. Hi, Fill-in-the-Name 

Creates an informal conversation with people you know well. 

 

2. Good morning/afternoon 

Somewhat more formal. Also a good dodge if you don't know the name or gender of the person you're emailing. 

 

3. Just got your email 

Tells the recipient that you are making him/her your top priority. 

 

4. Here's the info you requested 

Gets high readership because it's something the recipient wants to know about. 

 

5. I have an update/news for you 

Communicates that the email contains must-see information. 

 

6Checking in 

For routine progress reports, or a tactful way to request one from others. 

 

7. Important/urgent/code blue/SOS 

Save this for occasions when you seriously need immediate attention or assistance.  

 

8. Mission accomplished 

Announces that your project or task is completed, the company's goal has been met, etc. 

 

9. Greetings and salutations 

A bit humorous, for when you want to get someone in a good mood. 

 

10. First, let me apologize 

For that email we all have to write sooner or later, to explain your mistake and proposed damage control. 

 

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