You're Not Letting Anyone Down If You Take a Vacation.

  • vacation email

If you feel guilty about taking time off and leaving others to cover for you, you're not alone. The vast majority of U.S. workers' paid vacation time goes unused every year. Here's why you should take that vacay with a clear conscience.

 

Nobody wants a burned out team member.

You may think your presence is essential to the team's functioning well. But if you're exhausted, you're probably more of a hindrance than a help. Numerous mistakes, injuries and accidents have been attributed to physical and/or mental tiredness in all walks of life, from aerospace engineers to construction workers. Do any of these ring a bell: Chernobyl, Three Mile Island, Exxon Valdez, Air France Flight 447? All linked to "impaired performance due to fatigue." Don't let this be you.

 

You'll be a happier employee.

When the huge accounting firm Ernst & Young surveyed its staff, it found that those who took their vacation had greater job satisfaction and tended to stay longer with the company. This led to better productivity, teamwork and performance reviews. Which is exactly what you want when promotions and raises are being decided.

 

You'll showcase your organizing and planning skills.

Before you take off, you'll make arrangements so that your team will still get the work done and deadlines met. Way to impress the boss!

 

You'll come back healthier.

Numerous medical studies have shown that taking a vacation improves sleep, digestive problems, cardiovascular illnesses such as high blood pressure and many other chronic disorders, especially those caused by stress. So it's a no-brainer that mental and emotional health also benefits from a change of scene. In fact, there are also studies demonstrating better problem solving, faster reaction times and stronger neural connections post-vacation.

 

You'll come back inspired.

Getting away from the daily grind not only recharges body and mind. It's also a proven method of generating new ideas and solutions. You just may return to work with an innovation that will take your company to the next level ... and you along with it.

 

It's time to get rid of that old idea that a workaholic is a better worker. It's just not true on any level. Go ahead, take the break you've got coming to you. Enjoy the time with your family and friends. You'll be a more valuable asset to your employer, and have a better life into the bargain.

You might be interested in...

10.19.20
How to Recognize — and Fix — Low Employee Morale
We've all seen the studies on how low employee morale impacts a business, from reduced productivity to increased turnover. Granted, it's a complex problem, with some factors that cause dissatisfaction — such as the current pandemic — beyond the employer's control.   However, there are plenty of things you can do to boost positivity and mitigate negativity within the company. And many don't cost a dime.   Step 1 is reading the warning signs. Step 2 is implementing corrective action.   The sign: They call in sick a lot Whether due to physical stress or mental burnout, rising absenteeism is a serious concern. Gallup studies have shown that people with low wellbeing scores can cost a company up to $28,000 a year, compared to only $840 for happy and engaged workers.   The fix: Overwork is the number one reason for physical/mental stress-related ailments (which can range from depression and anger to cardiovascular illnesses). Analyze your operations to identify sources...
Read More
10.15.20
How to Approach Your Boss About Work-Life Balance
Do you feel like your workload is beyond your current capabilities? You aren't the only one.   Especially in this time of COVID-19, many people need to cut back on their working hours because they have family members to care for or concerns about their own health and safety in the workplace. Or you may be in the situation of answering to a boss who expects you to work overtime every day — and you're afraid to say no because you could get laid off, or at least a bad performance review.   Life commitments outside of work — such as family, education or even just relaxing and recharging — should get their fair share of your time and energy. If you don't maintain this balance, you risk getting burned out, and then you'll be no good to either your employer or yourself.   If the time has come to bring up this tricky subject with your boss, here's how to go about it for the best chance of a satisfactory outcome.   Identify the Problem The first step to finding a solution is...
Read More
10.12.20
The Most Important Part of Recruiting Is What Happens Next
$3,500 per new hire in recruiting costs (advertising, HR's time/labor, etc.) $702 average cost to train a new employee 6 months to break-even point on a new employee's productivity level   With numbers like these staring us in the face, it behooves any company to make sure their new employee sticks around long enough to deliver a return on their investment. And that means making retention a top priority.   Want even more reasons to work on your employee retention? Contented employees are more productive, as many studies have shown Frequent introduction of newbies stresses the whole team, increasing job dissatisfaction It costs more to replace an employee than to improve their job satisfaction   Why They Leave — It's Not Always About the Money Surveys of workers who quit their job reveal that salary is not even among the top five reasons. More often, the decision to leave is motivated by unhappiness with conditions such as an unpleasant work environment,...
Read More
General

Title

More Info
You need an account to do that Set up an account Never Mind

Please register for an account first. If you already have one, log in here.