Integrity Staffing Solutions
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3.28.16
3 Things I Wish I Knew Before My Interview
You thought you were well prepared. But once you got in there, you (and the interviewer too, no doubt) realized that some of your comments — or silences — showed a few bases you failed to cover.   1. I wish I knew more about the company. These days, you're expected to do some research on what the business does, who its customers and competitors are, and what sort of economic climate it's operating in at the moment. This will enable you to answer questions like, "How do you see yourself contributing to our company's success?" in a more relatable, solutions-oriented way. For example, you might highlight your experience with a technology you know the company has just implemented.   2. I wish I knew it was OK to ask questions. Don't just prepare answers. The interview is a two-way street and you need to learn whether you want to work there as much as they need to learn whether they want you. You both will be better assured of a good fit if you get a realistic picture of...
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3.21.16
Is Your Job Candidate Bluffing? 3 Ways to Find Out
Some people will fill their resumes and interview responses with whatever they think you want to hear, regardless of whether it's 100% true. They think you won't know the difference, but here's how to prove them wrong.   1. Background checks. We don't just mean criminal records. Also verify educational credentials and employment history; these are the two most common areas for "exaggerating," and even some of the nation's top executives have been guilty of it.   You can hire a service to do the checking for you. You can also do a little investigating on your own. See if a candidate's social media pages contain discrepancies: different schools, degrees or employment dates on different sites. Contact previous supervisors, not just the employer's HR department, for more honest reports of the individual's capabilities.   2. Real-world skills tests. It's easy for candidates to tick boxes on a list of job requirements. It's not so easy to demonstrate that they can actually...
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3.14.16
There Is an Easier Way to Get to Know Your Co-workers
Hanging out with them at the nearest bar after work is one way. But it's hardly the most professional. Here are 3 things you can do to build relationships with colleagues that will maintain your on-the-job image and promote your career growth.   1. Offer your help. Working together on a project will offer numerous opportunities to learn about each other's personality and work style. This understanding will naturally lead to a higher functioning team.   2. Strike up a conversation in the break room. People who dislike casual chat while they're working will be more receptive when they're off the clock. Just don't share too much: details about your love life, religious views, etc., are not appropriate for work relationships.   3. Invite them to an extracurricular activity. Again, take your corporate culture into consideration: in some workplaces, outside socializing is the norm but in others it's not. And make sure the occasion is "safe for work": a birthday lunch for a...
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3.07.16
Finally, a Few Great Questions to Ask Your Future Employer in Your Next Interview
You've already heard the most common recommendations: questions that are really designed to show the hiring manager what a great candidate you are. And you should definitely include them. But there's another great way to build rapport with your interviewer: change the focus from your skills and goals to the company's needs and wants.   These 4 questions not only open up discussions of how hiring you can help solve the employer's problems, they also give you a much clearer picture of what it's really like to work there.   1. What are the company's biggest worries for the present and future? You have (ideally) already researched their industry, competitors, etc. Now ask for their view from the inside, something you can never get from Google. You'll also learn what your prospects are for career growth.   2. What is the most challenging aspect of working here? If you're lucky, you might get an honest opinion about budget constraints, management weaknesses or customer...
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2.29.16
If It's Too Good to Be True, Your Job Offer Is a Scam!
The growth of the online job market has made it easier than ever to find your dream job. Unfortunately, it has also made it easier for scammers to find you. Here are 3 red flags that what sounds like a great buy-in is really a big rip-off.   1. You need to pay money for something. The "employers" might say they need an advance for work permits, travel expenses or training. Even sneakier, they might send you a cashier's check for a huge amount, tell you to deduct the expenses and send back the rest. Trouble is, the check is forged and when it bounces your bank will take that money out of YOUR account. A cashier's check is no guarantee of safety. And run from anyone who wants you to deal in untraceable moneygrams.   Real employers will never ask for money up front, or try to obtain your confidential financial or personal information.   2. The compensation is unrealistically high. $500 to work one hour as a secret shopper? Yeah, right. Scammers will try to lure you by...
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2.15.16
The Secret to Transitioning from an Intern to an Employee
Getting great experience is not the only — or even the best — reason for students and recent grads to go into an internship program. There's also the possibility that the company you're interning with will offer you a full-time job.   How can you maximize your chances of receiving that golden offer? Think of your internship as an audition for the job.   Act like you want to be. You want to be an employee with this company, so act like one. Dress professionally, be reliable, show teamwork and initiative — all the behaviors that prove you'd be an excellent permanent addition to the staff.   Go above and beyond. Show that you're flexible and eager to contribute by volunteering for projects outside of your regular duties. Create a niche for yourself doing something nobody else thought of or has time for, like expanding the company's social media presence. Make them realize that they can't get along with out you.   Communicate with your manager. If progress meetings aren't...
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2.08.16
5 Simple Ways to Get Noticed by Recruiters
You already use the Internet to find potential employers, but did you know that you can also use it to help them find you? These strategies will keep you from getting lost in the shuffle.   1. Complete and/or update all your social media profiles. This may seem obvious, but you wouldn't be the first to create a profile on LinkedIn, then forget about it for five years. Check that they all contain a complete work history, a professional looking photo and anything else you want recruiters to see. It's a pretty sure bet that they'll be looking!   2. SEO yourself. Search Engine Optimization is a trick that websites use to get search engines like Google to display their URL whenever people search for whatever that site sells. For example, a jewelry website would fill its content with words/phrases like "gold jewelry" and "diamond rings." You can do the same: sprinkle your resume, online profiles and posts with keywords and meta tags that match the ones used by the job postings...
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1.27.16
Our Best Recruiters Spill Their Secrets About Getting Real Interview Results
All to often, we don't learn what we really need to know about a job candidate during the interview. We ask standard questions and get canned answers. Or we spend most of the time going over what we'd already read in the resumé. Result: a poor fit and a high turnover rate.   At Integrity Staffing Solutions, we of course use state-of-the-art skills testing and background verifications to make sure applicants meet the requirements for doing the job. But these alone are not exceptionally good predictors of success: It's the individual's personality that makes the crucial difference.   This is where the interview comes in, and why it's so important. Our recruiters share 3 techniques for getting a deeper insight into what the candidate is really like, and whether he/she will complement your corporate culture.   1. Behavioral interviewing. This style of interview has become popular in recent years, because past behavior is a more accurate predictor of future behavior than...
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1.25.16
Making a Career Bucket List
Why is setting career goals important? As you've probably heard many times before, it's pretty hard to get where you want to be if you don't have a route map of how to get there. But let's turn that saying around: you can't make a route map until you know where you want to go.   So let's make some career goals — ones that you can actually use as signposts along the way to your ultimate dream job.   1. Define the dream. This is where you put aside all thoughts of limitations, and write down what you really want to do in your work life. Even if it's something totally different from what you're doing now.   Think about: ·     What activities you enjoy and are good at. ·     What types of position you feel most comfortable with: being the leader or the follower, doing your own thing or contributing to an established mission. ·     Which is more important: soul satisfaction or salary.   2. Determine a timeline for achieving the goal. This is where you perform a...
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12.28.15
How to Make More Money in 2016
Think you deserve a raise or a promotion? Well, the reality is, you probably won't get one unless you ask for it.   Gone are the days of automatic yearly increases for all employees. You might think this trend started with the recent economic crunch, but it actually goes back long before that. We'll save the reasons behind it for another article; what you want to know right now is how to get more money in your pocket every payday.   1. Don't ask during your performance review. For one thing, many companies have already finalized their payroll budget before they start holding annual employee reviews. This makes it easy for them to tell you it's too late to change anything. Try to schedule your salary meeting two months in advance of your normal review month.   Also, the review is often focused on things the employee needs to improve; or, in less politically correct wording, what you did wrong last year. You want your salary conversation to be all about what you did right....
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