Day 9: Social Media

  • screen shot 2016 06 08 at 5 08 35 pm

 

Do Recruiters Check Your Social Media? 

In a word of evolving technology, social media is now usually your first impression on an employer or recruiter. Chances are when you’re talking to that recruiter over the phone for that pre-screening phone interview, they are looking at your profile picture or what you ate for lunch last Monday. In fact, 80% of recruiters check applicants Facebook pages prior to making a hiring decision.

 

Be Authethentic.

Keep in mind that you have control of what information you put on the internet and what image you portray. Avoid offensive photos or controversial posts on your social media. This is particularly something to remember if your accounts are public and anyone can search them. Check your social media privacy settings to make sure you know what content is public information. A great way to check out your public online presence is through BrandYourself.com. This website flags any potentially damaging information, so you can be notified immediately.

 

Leverage Social Media To Your Advantage

Social Media is not always a hindrance to one’s future career. A great strategy to stand out in certain fields is leveraging social media to share industry knowledge. If you’re looking for a career in fashion, for instance, creating an Instagram and Pinterest account could be a great way to advertise yourself.

 

In general, join professional interest groups and alumni networks; they’re great places to show off your expertise and make valuable connections. Comment regularly, so that your name will come to mind when another group member is looking to hire.

 

You can also follow the Facebook Fan pages of companies you’d like to work for. Some even have a link to their job opportunities, making it super easy to apply. And if the company’s recruiter sees that you’ve been posting intelligent comments on their page, you’ll be one step ahead.

 

 

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