Integrity Staffing Solutions
best of staffing 2019 client 2x 1

Day 17: Company Research

  • companyresearch

Why should you bother to learn about a company you’ve sent an application to? After all, they’re the ones that should be researching you, right? Wrong.

 

Nothing makes a better impression on an interviewer than being familiar with the company. In fact, you are quite likely to hear the question, “What do you know about us?” during the interview. If you can come up with some ready answers to that question, you’ll demonstrate that you’re genuinely interested in working for them.

 

Every time you apply for a job, take 5 or 10 minutes to dig up a few facts about that business and jot them down in case you make it to the interview stage. If these facts are things that interest you personally, you’ll be more likely to remember them and discuss them enthusiastically during the interview. For example, if you’re into preserving the environment, in what eco-friendly efforts does the company engage?

 

Fortunately, with the internet at your disposal, it has never been easier to access company information than it is now. Avenues to explore include:

 

The company’s website

 

Their Facebook page, Twitter feed or other social media presence

 

Industry discussion boards

 

LinkedIn profiles of company principals

 

Asking questions about the company during the interview is another excellent way to display your interest. Just make sure they aren’t ones you could easily find the answers to through public information channels, or you’ll come across as being too lazy to do your own preparation.

 

When you share a genuine interest in the company with your interviewer, you’re one step closer to being a colleague instead of an applicant … and one step further along your road to career success.

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